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Fire Bringer

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Young buck Rannoch was born on the night his father was murdered and into a herd of deer where hunger for power has gradually whittled away at all that is true and good. He knows he must escape to survive. Chased by stags, with their fearsome antlers sharpened for the kill, he begins a treacherous journey into the unknown, and ahead of him lies a shocking and formidable se Young buck Rannoch was born on the night his father was murdered and into a herd of deer where hunger for power has gradually whittled away at all that is true and good. He knows he must escape to survive. Chased by stags, with their fearsome antlers sharpened for the kill, he begins a treacherous journey into the unknown, and ahead of him lies a shocking and formidable search for truth and goodwill in the shadow of the Great Mountain. One day he will have to return to his home and face his destiny among the deer to fulfill the prophecy that has persistently given them hope: that one day a fawn will be born with the mark of an oak leaf on his forehead and that fawn's courage will lead all the deer to freedom. Filled with passion and a darkness that gradually, through Rannoch's courage in the face of adversity, lifts to reveal an overwhelming feeling of light, Fire Bringer is a tremendous, spirited story that takes the reader deep into the hearts and minds of its characters as they fight for their right to live in peace.

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30 review for Fire Bringer

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cait • A Page with a View

    I kept thinking this reminded me of Watership Down except set in Scotland with deer... and apparently I'm not alone in that observation. I think this could be a really pretty story depending on your taste! It had potential, but the execution reallllly killed the story for me. The writing was just so painfully dull & dry. I felt like I was being told about a story instead of actually reading one. Everything just dragged forever and I'm positive I wouldn't have even finished this when I was you I kept thinking this reminded me of Watership Down except set in Scotland with deer... and apparently I'm not alone in that observation. I think this could be a really pretty story depending on your taste! It had potential, but the execution reallllly killed the story for me. The writing was just so painfully dull & dry. I felt like I was being told about a story instead of actually reading one. Everything just dragged forever and I'm positive I wouldn't have even finished this when I was younger (and Watership Down was my favorite book in 5th grade). 2.5 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    I've discovered that what most people think when they look at this book is "It's an epic fantasy about deer? Well, unless you're some kind of deer lover, it's got to be boring, right?" Wrong. In his debut novel, Clement-Davies spins a world of incredible, realistic fantasy. Much as he did later in "The Sight," he populates this world with prophecies, myths, dark forces, spirits, gods, and unlikely heroes and heroines. And the result never ceases to amaze me. High in the hills of Scotland, amid one I've discovered that what most people think when they look at this book is "It's an epic fantasy about deer? Well, unless you're some kind of deer lover, it's got to be boring, right?" Wrong. In his debut novel, Clement-Davies spins a world of incredible, realistic fantasy. Much as he did later in "The Sight," he populates this world with prophecies, myths, dark forces, spirits, gods, and unlikely heroes and heroines. And the result never ceases to amaze me. High in the hills of Scotland, amid one of the herds of proud red deer, a fawn is born to the stag captain Brechin. On that same night, Brechin is murdered in a dark plot by the tyrannical Drail, who seeks to make the herd, and eventually all the deer in the valley, his own. But Brechin's calf, Rannoch, is in grave danger. For he is born with a white oak leaf on his forehead: the sign of a prophesied hero who will rise to bring the true ways of the wild back again. But not before he has endured an unimaginable quest. In a tradition as epic as any ancient mythical hero, Rannoch and his friends, a wonderful and diverse cast of characters that are fantastically written, must travel into the heart of the wilderness to seek sanctuary from Drail. Like "Watership Down," this book makes you take a closer look at an often dismissed animal, into you are pulled so completely into the adventure you can't believe you ever thought deer were boring.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    This book tries to be a Watership Down with deer. The problem is it is too much of a Watership Down with deer. It doesn't really stand apart from Watership. It is a pale imitation for three reasons. The first is many of the characters are cardboard cut-outs, either based off of the rabbits from Watership or off of stock characters that appear in novels. The second reason is that the world-building that Clement-Davies does for the deer doesn't fully make sense. There are small errors in it that s This book tries to be a Watership Down with deer. The problem is it is too much of a Watership Down with deer. It doesn't really stand apart from Watership. It is a pale imitation for three reasons. The first is many of the characters are cardboard cut-outs, either based off of the rabbits from Watership or off of stock characters that appear in novels. The second reason is that the world-building that Clement-Davies does for the deer doesn't fully make sense. There are small errors in it that stand out and make the deer's world a little unbelievable. The third reason is that Clement-Davies does not have the use of language that Adams does in Watership. Normally this wouldn't be a problem,but because Fire Bringer draws heavily from Down it becomes one. The difference in usage made me want to hurry up and finish Fire Bringer, so I could re-read Watership Down. Fire Bringer is a good first attempt, but not a great book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Oksana *Bookaholic*

    One thing - I really really REALLY don't like Clement-Davies' writing. You might even come to say that I despise it with a fiery passion. But it seems like no matter what I do, I keep being drawn to his books. First The Sight, which I really despised. Then The Telling Pool, which was so boring that I seriously felt myself losing brain cells. WHY did I keep reading his books if i absolutely positively hated did not like them??? Well, I was browsing books, and I wandered over to the C's. I saw "Fi One thing - I really really REALLY don't like Clement-Davies' writing. You might even come to say that I despise it with a fiery passion. But it seems like no matter what I do, I keep being drawn to his books. First The Sight, which I really despised. Then The Telling Pool, which was so boring that I seriously felt myself losing brain cells. WHY did I keep reading his books if i absolutely positively hated did not like them??? Well, I was browsing books, and I wandered over to the C's. I saw "Fire Bringer". Do not pick it up!, I told myself, No, no, NO! As you probably already guessed, I did pick it up (the cover is really pretty, btw... A certain shade of blue mixed with- Ok, I'm shutting up now). And I'm thanking my lucky stars that I did. Nowadays, all the books are about "dark" girls that are all, "Oh no! I can't choose between him and him! Ahhh this is torture!!!!" and lame love stories that make you wish you had a trashcan nearby. This was a fresh breath for me. I don't really like "old-recent" books, (this was published in 1999), and I am usually browsing the new releases to find a half decent book or some such. Point is, this isn't my typical book. So if I enjoyed it, I'm betting two thirds of you guys also will. This is about a deer. (Surprise, surprise. I'm sure you haven't guessed that from the cover.) And I'm not going to list all about this book because if you really want to know you'll read the synopsis. So, one big thing I really liked is that it wasn't lame. At least not for me. I have a big problem with talking animals. Animals. Do. Not. Talk! So if you are writing on a point of view about animals, make it believable and not lame. Please. Spare humanity and the trees that will die to publish your terrible book. Like his previous book, The Sight. It was about talking wolves. But it was lame and boring and all kinds of other things that make up a book with a title called: Do Not Read Me I Suck B- moooooving on... Thankfully, this book was believable most of the time. And while I'm sure deer don't contemplate in the way Clement-Davies wrote about, it was still slightly believable. Only bad thing- the book tends to focus on something boring, like the description of a herd gathering to attack, for a long period of time. It starts getting all icky and UGH. Nobody likes run-on descriptions. Especially Chuck Norris. I thought this book was agreeable and a lot of fun. It transported you into a way different world, but since you knew so much about that world from his descriptions, it was actually fun. The end (actually the very last sentence) made me sniffle... But that's life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Veazey

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Oh, dear! Mild Spoilers ahead! Normally when selecting a book there are a few key factor used into deciding wether I want to bother picking it up or not. I'm very lucky I didn't physically see this book in a store, or I don't think I would have bothered with it at all. I know it's rather shallow of me, but books with such small font are intimidating to me since I am usually such a casual reader. I usually get headaches from reading such long books, and this one is a whopper at nearly 500 pages! Oh, dear! Mild Spoilers ahead! Normally when selecting a book there are a few key factor used into deciding wether I want to bother picking it up or not. I'm very lucky I didn't physically see this book in a store, or I don't think I would have bothered with it at all. I know it's rather shallow of me, but books with such small font are intimidating to me since I am usually such a casual reader. I usually get headaches from reading such long books, and this one is a whopper at nearly 500 pages! I have to say though, I am very grateful I decided to pick this one up. As a kid, I loved anthropomorphic fiction. (The Poppy series and Watership down were some of my favourites,) and I wish I had heard (or herd, if I want to continue with my bad deer puns,) this book sooner because I just know I would have loved it in middle or high school. Everything about this story was believable and epic. Such a huge story with a huge array of characters is usually difficult for me to follow since I take longer to read such small-printed books, but I had a difficult time putting this book down. I was surprised with myself, it only took a few days to finish. I strongly recommend this book to anyone who loves animal fiction. It takes its readers seriously without being too dull, there is always something happening. Also, I'd like to point out, this is the first time in a long time I have found a book I absolutely love that the author didn't kill off my favourite character. Though my second favourite (Poor Peppa!) met a less fortunate end, I am glad to see that Bankfoot came out all right in the end. Overall, this book is great. It was pure, delicious adventure that left me wanting more.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    I should change my category of "children's literature" to young adult literature, but I digress. My nephew recommended this book with rave reviews, and he was dead on with that. As soon as he finished this book, he read it a second time, which is quite a commitment in a rather long book, with much smaller print than most young adult novels. This book is reviewed as being a "Watership Down" but with rabbits, and that seems like quite the fair assessment. It is set in Scotland about 400 years ago, I should change my category of "children's literature" to young adult literature, but I digress. My nephew recommended this book with rave reviews, and he was dead on with that. As soon as he finished this book, he read it a second time, which is quite a commitment in a rather long book, with much smaller print than most young adult novels. This book is reviewed as being a "Watership Down" but with rabbits, and that seems like quite the fair assessment. It is set in Scotland about 400 years ago, maybe more, and is about a herd of red deer. The protagonist Rannoch seems to be the chosen one, fulfilling a deer prophecy, and he is a wonderful and conflicted hero, seeking to figure out what he is meant to do in this world as he flees for his life from his herd that is being destroyed and changed from within. The book grapples with questions of faith, and if there is a God, or if religious stories and myths are only true and real in the way that all stories are real. Unlike many young adult books, it doesn't deliver a clearcut answer to the reader about this, and instead just trusts the reader to make up their own mind about the world, and to dwell in what is unknowable. But it is not all heady stuff, but rather is mostly just a wonderfully action packed adventure story filled with friends taking care of one another. Strongly recommend this to any young readers, ages 10 or up, or any adults who like kids literature.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    A Watership Down for Deer! It took me about two pages to get into this book. To be honest, I know almost nothing about deer and I was a bit lost at first by the descriptions of their bez tines and trez tines but that turned out to be a very small hindrance indeed. The writing is superb and I found myself frequently thinking back to the story during the day between readings and wondering what would happen to the characters and whether or not they would be OK without me. The parallels to the nativit A Watership Down for Deer! It took me about two pages to get into this book. To be honest, I know almost nothing about deer and I was a bit lost at first by the descriptions of their bez tines and trez tines but that turned out to be a very small hindrance indeed. The writing is superb and I found myself frequently thinking back to the story during the day between readings and wondering what would happen to the characters and whether or not they would be OK without me. The parallels to the nativity story in the beginning of the book are almost unnerving. They seemed too blatant to be unintentional so I watched closely throughout the book to see what the author intended to do with them but nothing ever came of them as far as I could see. Perhaps doing nothing was exactly what the author intended. I don't know. On the whole, this was a book I enjoyed reading very much for the experience it brought me on, but I don't think it left an indelible mark on my life. But, of course, a week is usually a bit early to know that.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mayomouse

    This is a TOTAL must read. I simply loved this book. Yes, there was bloodshed. Yes, some parts were sad. But this was AMAZINGLY written. To write so perfectly from the POV of a deer? Wow. This book deserved all 5 stars even though, as I admitted, it's gory and very sad at times. And the ending is happy...but sad. READ THIS IMMEDIATELY.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Barak Fredrickson

    Solid character development throughout. Lots of characters to keep track of though. It is a very long, but worthwhile read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Annye

    I borrowed a copy of Fire Bringer from a far-away friend I only see in person once a year. It got buried in my TBR stack until I found it about a week before my yearly visit with that friend. "It says Young Adult on the back!" I assured myself. "I'll just finish what I'm reading now, then I'll have three days or so to read it. That's more than enough time for a quick YA book." I hadn't considered that Fire Bringer was published in 1999, and "Young Adult" wasn't then what it is now. Fire Bringer fo I borrowed a copy of Fire Bringer from a far-away friend I only see in person once a year. It got buried in my TBR stack until I found it about a week before my yearly visit with that friend. "It says Young Adult on the back!" I assured myself. "I'll just finish what I'm reading now, then I'll have three days or so to read it. That's more than enough time for a quick YA book." I hadn't considered that Fire Bringer was published in 1999, and "Young Adult" wasn't then what it is now. Fire Bringer follows a young red deer, Rannoch, who was born with a prophecy-foretold mark on his forehead. His family, his herd, and in fact most of the creatures on his island home put their faith and hope in the deer, that one day he'll save them as the prophecy predicts. But Rannoch is reluctant, scared, and unsure of his own power. Except for talking animals, there's no real fantasy in this world. Despite the realism, Clement-Davies has created one of the most beautiful and believable worlds I've read in some time. His deer have deer thoughts and deer issues - food, sex, how many tines are on whose antlers - and that realism is so pleasant to read (in contrast to horses who act like dogs, in the abominable Disney tradition; those are softened children's animals who don't procreate or worry about how to eat and stay warm in the winter). And then layered onto the realistic base traits is a rich, created culture, with its own vocabulary, social structure, myths, and religion. Instead of just putting humans and their beliefs in animal bodies, Clement-Davies takes talking animal protagonists as they are and sweetens with a believable society. I like reading modern YA, but Fire Bringer is something else; it really emphasizes how much Young Adult literature has changed in the past twenty years. Fire Bringer is, for YA, a long, tough, deep read - it slowed down my own reading pace, and I imagine a young person would similarly stumble on the death, despair, and deep religious themes. But where modern YA focuses on plot, romance, and self-insertion, Fire Bringer's themes of faith and the questioning of it seem both old-fashioned and refreshing. (To be clear, this is not a Christian, or even religious, book, except for the religion and faith of the deer and other animals in the story. There's no preaching to the reader in this one.) In one hugely broad generalization, it seems to me that today's YA themes come from the plot or the characters. Fire Bringer's come from the world. By no means is all old YA prettier or deeper or worth more. But I don't think Fire Bringer would be classified as YA if it were published today - it's too big, too dense, and too wandering. All this to say - this book is beautiful, moving, and a bit of a harrowing read. Clement-Davies has created the kind of culture in Fire Bringer that is at the same time hauntingly realistic and distinctly exclusive for this island of deer. Read more of my reviews (plus cat pics!) on Her Little Book Review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    johanna

    The only reason this book is not five stars, is because of all the bloodshed, I think. It was an excellent book. Nearly 500 pages long, it really delved into the nature and lives of red deer. Other than enjoying this book, I also gained a lot of knowledge on the nature of deer - how they live, how they feed, how they travel . . . it was amazing. The omniscient point of view was both surprising and intriguing - you would switch from following Rannoch and his friends straight into the mind of the The only reason this book is not five stars, is because of all the bloodshed, I think. It was an excellent book. Nearly 500 pages long, it really delved into the nature and lives of red deer. Other than enjoying this book, I also gained a lot of knowledge on the nature of deer - how they live, how they feed, how they travel . . . it was amazing. The omniscient point of view was both surprising and intriguing - you would switch from following Rannoch and his friends straight into the mind of the evil master-mind, Sgorr, and his deadly armies. You would hear of things before the characters did, and have explained to you the knowledge they lacked. Usually I would have thought of the omniscient point of view unnatural and confusing, but somehow it added to the story's excitement and thrill. The only reason I was slightly uncomfortable with this book was the realism. The deer were both realistic and fictional - talking, thinking, feeling creatures, but also deer. Animals. The way the stags chose their hinds was utterly realistic . . . the hinds had more or less no choice in the matter, and though this is realistic . . . those hinds also spoke and felt and thought. They were essentially people, and yet they lived like animals. Then the bloodshed. The author went into glorious, gory detail of how the antlers tore into the deer's flesh, blood pooling on the ground, eyes glazing over . . . I'm okay with some gore, but wow. Lastly, I think, Sgorr. The only point in the book that I disliked - Sgorr's secret. Eurgh. Almost unnecessarily horrible? Or is that just me. Not something you expect to find in a story about deer, which Goodreads compares to Watership Down.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    This book is for any animal lover or not, a gripping tale of a struggle from a deer's point of view. A young adults' book but older and younger people could enjoy it also. "There is a prophecy among deer. One day, a fawn will be born with the mark of an ok leaf upon his forehead. His courage will lead the deer to freedom; his strength will defeat their greatest enemy." Rannoch is born the night his father is murdered. As the attention is turned to him, he must run for his life as stags who won t This book is for any animal lover or not, a gripping tale of a struggle from a deer's point of view. A young adults' book but older and younger people could enjoy it also. "There is a prophecy among deer. One day, a fawn will be born with the mark of an ok leaf upon his forehead. His courage will lead the deer to freedom; his strength will defeat their greatest enemy." Rannoch is born the night his father is murdered. As the attention is turned to him, he must run for his life as stags who won the struggle for power (for now) hunt him. Rannoch begins his journey, learning about the world and himself as he goes. He loses friends and gains them, but he is seperated from his friends who escaped with him by man. But he will return to face the destiny he was born for and to defeat the forces that drove him away.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maddie

    This is easily one of the best books I have ever read. Fire Bringer is about a young fawn named Rannoch who is born with a whit fawn mark shaped like an oak leaf on his brow. Becausde of this mark, he is believed to be part of The Prophecy. Meanwhile, Lord Drail, the herds leader, is plotting to take over all of the herds in the Low Lands. Brechin, Rannochs father, is murdered that same night and some deer realize that Rannoch will be in danger. Fern, Alyth, Bracken, Shira, Canisp, and Breach ar This is easily one of the best books I have ever read. Fire Bringer is about a young fawn named Rannoch who is born with a whit fawn mark shaped like an oak leaf on his brow. Becausde of this mark, he is believed to be part of The Prophecy. Meanwhile, Lord Drail, the herds leader, is plotting to take over all of the herds in the Low Lands. Brechin, Rannochs father, is murdered that same night and some deer realize that Rannoch will be in danger. Fern, Alyth, Bracken, Shira, Canisp, and Breach are all hinds who flee with, if they have them, their fawns, Willow, Peppa, Bankfoot, Thistle, Tain, and Rannoch. This is not necisarily an animal person kind of book. It has many wars and encounters with other deer, semi-violent fighting, but David Clement-Davies ties this all in to an amzing book. Fire Bringer is a must read book for anyone looking for a good story.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anna Pappas

    Fire Bringer quite honestly blew me out of the water. With the depth of the plot, the creatively woven conflicts, and bold character development, it’s hard to know where to start. I did not think this book was going to be as detailed and thought-out as it was. It’s one of those engaging stories where you learn seemingly insignificant information in the beginning and you facepalm when everything falls into place at the end. It’s a cliffhanger start to finish. I was so enthralled that I finished i Fire Bringer quite honestly blew me out of the water. With the depth of the plot, the creatively woven conflicts, and bold character development, it’s hard to know where to start. I did not think this book was going to be as detailed and thought-out as it was. It’s one of those engaging stories where you learn seemingly insignificant information in the beginning and you facepalm when everything falls into place at the end. It’s a cliffhanger start to finish. I was so enthralled that I finished it in less than a week. The characters, which are deer, and their relationships are so well personified that you start to talk about them as if they are people. I was also surprised at how serious the tone could be at times. I had thought it would be a happy-go-lucky tale, but it actually incorporated times of dark revolution and suspense. This novel was undoubtedly worth the read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    NS - Cami Houston

    Appropriate 9-12-"Firebringer" did not disappoint. A good book for me captures my attention from the beginning; I don't have much patience for books to grow into something. The establishment of characters and gorgeous setting, the tyranny of the politics mixed with the theme of animals to compare to people, are all great elements set up in the first chapter. This book is not without its surprising twists and turns, and I guarantee a reader won't get bored with this novel if they're into animal-t Appropriate 9-12-"Firebringer" did not disappoint. A good book for me captures my attention from the beginning; I don't have much patience for books to grow into something. The establishment of characters and gorgeous setting, the tyranny of the politics mixed with the theme of animals to compare to people, are all great elements set up in the first chapter. This book is not without its surprising twists and turns, and I guarantee a reader won't get bored with this novel if they're into animal-themed books. It's an emotional journey filled with symbolism, friendship, betrayal, everything all jam-packed into one amazing book. Davies' extended metaphor of Rannoch to Christ is certainly interesting, and the end is much like the fate of that religious symbol.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mallory Shepherd

    I barely made it through the book. The author does not understand the storytelling concept of "don't tell me, show me." Instead of that he gives you "I will show you and THEN also tell you in case you missed it the first time. And while I'm telling you I'm going to explain the significance just in case you weren't paying attention to the story or are too dumb to follow along." It was arduous trying to make it through and completely distracted from the story, which wasn't a strong narrative to be I barely made it through the book. The author does not understand the storytelling concept of "don't tell me, show me." Instead of that he gives you "I will show you and THEN also tell you in case you missed it the first time. And while I'm telling you I'm going to explain the significance just in case you weren't paying attention to the story or are too dumb to follow along." It was arduous trying to make it through and completely distracted from the story, which wasn't a strong narrative to begin with. The characters were very one dimensional and the story predictable. I'm pretty sure this is a children's book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelsi

    What a masterpiece this adventurous fantasy novel was. Rich in detail that applies to all of the senses, carefully crafted chapters, skillfully-worded scenes make this MG book as good as it gets. Sending readers on a wild ride in early Scotia, David Clement-Davies leaves nothing out yet trims his paragraphs to perfection. An epic tale of learning who you are, destiny, war, and friendship. Highly recommended. 5 out of 5 stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kellie

    Definately one of my all-time favorite books. If you liked Watership Down, this story has a lot of parallels. It's an adventure story with philosophic and moral insights enough to intrigue the reader whom, like me, won't read a book unless it'll change me a bit but not so much that it overwhelms you.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    one word: AMAZSOMENESS that is what this book is about. I was so sad that it ended, very sad. I loved this book - and even though I don't really read about deers, it was very interesting. I loved it so much and I am sad that it ended. If I had to chose a book to read again, I would so read this one.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Charley

    I've had this book since i was about 13 and have read it so many times. I love it, its so exciting and epic, its like an animal lord of the rings full of adventure, betrayal, loyalty and courage and it has a great moral background of fighting for what you believe.A thrilling ride =D

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mads Whitmarsh-Jones

    Fire Bringer is one of those titles that sticks with you, one of the ones you heard all about at one time or another; it was the book that all the cool kids had read and that everyone knew about. For me, this was a middle school sentiment. It was with those memories in mind when I took it down off my shelf, where it has waited patiently for years. It's also worth mentioning that I had read The Sight, also by Clement-Davies, when I still was in middle school. About the only things I can recall abo Fire Bringer is one of those titles that sticks with you, one of the ones you heard all about at one time or another; it was the book that all the cool kids had read and that everyone knew about. For me, this was a middle school sentiment. It was with those memories in mind when I took it down off my shelf, where it has waited patiently for years. It's also worth mentioning that I had read The Sight, also by Clement-Davies, when I still was in middle school. About the only things I can recall about it are that all of the characters who mattered were wolves, there was a prophecy and a chosen one, en epic adventure, and I loved the heck out of it. Fire Bringer is exactly the same book, except with deer and minus the dazzlement. To be fair, I've come a long way since then. I read things differently now, and to give credit where it is justly due, The Sight is almost certainly better crafted than Fire Bringer simply because it was not Clement-Davies' first book. This didn't necessarily make Fire Bringer any less painful of a read in terms of the prose. My biggest complaint was that the action in the novel was sorely lacking; there were many times where something was told where it should have been shown - left to summary when a scene would have been much more effective. Despite this, I read all four hundred and ninety eight pages of it. Even though the presentation made me cringe and the story's conventions are (in essentials) exactly identical to The Sight, somewhere in there I found myself invested. If I figure out why I'll let you know. In the end I suppose it comes down to a good story. The prophecy convention is about as nuanced as a parlor trick, but like a parlor trick, it still, against all odds and my best intentions, works. Rannoch's quest, his denial of his role as the chosen one, his desire to learn who he is are all questions basic enough and yet resonant enough to carry the story on its circuitous journey around the high- and lowlands north of Hadrian's wall. There is also one more point on which I ought to give credit: Clement-Davies is brutal with his characters. There are members of the cast I expected to have main character privileges who were brutally and abruptly murdered throughout the course of the novel. There was a cold sort of reality to his treatment of death (which was one of the themes anyway and probably the point of the whole book) that was due in large part to this abruptness. There are definitely kudos to be had there, because I didn't see most of these deaths coming, and that is definitely something to write home about.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Pietro

    Questo è il primo libro tradotto in Italiano che leggo in più di due anni, e non posso dire che la cosa mi fosse mancata. Il portatore di fuoco è un'avventura classica che segue un protagonista predestinato, il cervo Rannoch, in un percorso di crescita/compimento della profezia che lo porterà a liberare le foreste della Scozia da Sgorr, il tiranno che minaccia la libertà di tutti gli animali. Il libro è mirato a un pubblico molto giovane quindi non aspettatevi risvolti politici machiavellici e per Questo è il primo libro tradotto in Italiano che leggo in più di due anni, e non posso dire che la cosa mi fosse mancata. Il portatore di fuoco è un'avventura classica che segue un protagonista predestinato, il cervo Rannoch, in un percorso di crescita/compimento della profezia che lo porterà a liberare le foreste della Scozia da Sgorr, il tiranno che minaccia la libertà di tutti gli animali. Il libro è mirato a un pubblico molto giovane quindi non aspettatevi risvolti politici machiavellici e personaggi profondi e sfaccettati ma nel complesso è molto godibile e piacevole da leggere. La narrazione è un po' altalenante e alterna momenti davvero ottimi a scene decisamente più deboli, con personaggi che agiscono in modo anomalo solo per tirare avanti la trama (come il cervo Thistle, cui unico scopo durante tutto il libro è rompere i c******i), situazioni risolte con eventi completamente casuali (deus ex machina come se piovesse) e in generale alcuni risvolti che non hanno molto senso... farei degli esempi ma andrei a spoilerare tutto. In ogni caso questi elementi non danneggiano eccessivamente la lettura una volta accettato il fatto che è una favola e deve essere presa come tale. Una cosa che invece mi ha infastidito parecchio tutto il tempo è la traduzione. Come ho già detto non leggevo nulla di tradotto da un bel pezzo e forse per questo motivo ho notato i difetti più del normale, ma per quanto mi riguarda è fatta veramente male. - Grammatica: Aprite una pagina a caso, iniziate a leggere e tempo qualche riga troverete un tempo verbale sbagliato. 'Nuff Said. - Connotazione: La scelta dei vocaboli tende sempre verso un tono molto infantile, anche se nella scena non ci sta per niente. Es: Megabattaglia con fuoco e sangue ovunque, duello verbale tra personaggi in una situazione decisamente epica e "Don't lie" diventa "Non dire bugie". Ma che è? Un litigio nel cortile dell'asilo? -Altro: Spesso e volentieri la traduttrice "ci mette del suo", alterando il testo originale... niente di catastrofico ma fastidioso lo stesso.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lamonica Williams

    In the lands of Scotland lives a herd of deer. Among this herd is Rannoch, a special deer with a prophecy chasing him. On the night he was born, the head deer, Drail, and his second, Sgorr, were killing certain members of the herd called Outriders. Rannoch's father was killed forcing several other deer to leave in hopes to get away from all the trouble. As Rannoch grows he learns more about the prophecy and how he plans on stopping Drail and Sgorr. I chose to read this book because I read David In the lands of Scotland lives a herd of deer. Among this herd is Rannoch, a special deer with a prophecy chasing him. On the night he was born, the head deer, Drail, and his second, Sgorr, were killing certain members of the herd called Outriders. Rannoch's father was killed forcing several other deer to leave in hopes to get away from all the trouble. As Rannoch grows he learns more about the prophecy and how he plans on stopping Drail and Sgorr. I chose to read this book because I read David Clement-Davies's The Sight and I loved it. I decided that I would give Fire Bringer a chance since it was written by the same author as The Sight. I liked how this book was about an animal that most people wouldn't read about. I never thought I'd find myself reading a book about deer. The good things about this book was that the first chapter had action in it. I felt like I needed to be convinced to read the book but the first chapter did the trick. I didn't like how Rannoch seemed to not have the mindset of the prophesied deer that everyone was waiting for. He did a lot of running away and avoiding things he should've had taken care of. My overall impression of the book was that it was just okay. It wasn't as good as The Sight, in my opinion. I think a little bit more action in the middle would've made the book better. I felt like it was a let down compared to The Sight. It was still a good book but it did it slow in the middle. I'd recommend this book to anyone who like reading about fantasy and animals that can talk. It has a good amount of action in it and it has a good story line but it does get a little dry in the middle. The only warnings I'd have for this book is that if you cant handle the fact that animals kill each other, you probably shouldn't read it. There is fights between the deer and the book does well with getting around that fact that these fights are bloody. To be honest, there's not much I would warn someone about.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Francesca

    I read this book once, years ago, and it was so bizarre picking it up again. The characters came straight back to me and I had the same images I did the last time I read it. For it to have left such a lasting impression on someone who reads as many books as I do, speaks volumes for the author's incredible imagination. It does seem as if it's loosely based on something, other reviews have said watership down which I haven't read but, ridiculous as it sounds, I couldn't help thinking of the Lion K I read this book once, years ago, and it was so bizarre picking it up again. The characters came straight back to me and I had the same images I did the last time I read it. For it to have left such a lasting impression on someone who reads as many books as I do, speaks volumes for the author's incredible imagination. It does seem as if it's loosely based on something, other reviews have said watership down which I haven't read but, ridiculous as it sounds, I couldn't help thinking of the Lion King. There is no real link between them, it just seemed as if the characters and scenarios were fairly similar. Anyway, I absolutely love this book. It's not something I would read again in a hurry as it is a bit dense in places, but its a breath-taking read. My only complaint is a moment when Rannoch "winks" at Willow. It seems absurd for deer to be winking at each other, but then I suppose the whole concept of them talking to each other and everything else in the story is a bit far-fetched. But still, David Clement-Davies does an incredible job and now I'm itching to order "The Sight", another of his books with a similar story, that I also read years ago. The two of them are among the most memorable books I've ever read and I would definitely recommend them to people who are looking for something a bit different.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    an EPIC story of coming of age, and fulfilling your destiny. Told through the eyes of a young deer called Rannoch, who is chased out of his home heard due to fear of a white birth mark on his forehead, that is foretold in a prophecy. Running away with his friends and mother Rannoch has to learn about who he is and how he is connected to this "prophecy" in order to take down Sgorr a hornless dear that is destroying his home land and building an army of Stags. So yes, this story does sound kind of an EPIC story of coming of age, and fulfilling your destiny. Told through the eyes of a young deer called Rannoch, who is chased out of his home heard due to fear of a white birth mark on his forehead, that is foretold in a prophecy. Running away with his friends and mother Rannoch has to learn about who he is and how he is connected to this "prophecy" in order to take down Sgorr a hornless dear that is destroying his home land and building an army of Stags. So yes, this story does sound kind of corny, who ever heard of a deer who can talk, pfft. please don't be fooled, it is an amazing story that I found on a friends page and, WOW, it is the best find I have come across. it is engrossing! there wasn't a character that I didn't like. Well except the bad ones, but they were so fluently crafted that even the bad ones, though you hate them, you can admire them. They're so well written. IT HAS A MAP! I love books with maps, it makes it so easy to find where the characters are. in conclusion. I rate it . . . 100% Readable! get onto this book its pretty good. it has animals, love, a quest, a map!, a battle, and a story that is quite original.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Leanne

    I decided to read Fire Bringer by David Clement-Davies because it was recommended by goodreads many times. A character i found interesting was Eloin (the main characters mother). this is because she gave up her only son so he could be safe from the evil leaders of the herd. i think this showed tremendous courage and love because her decision was utterly heartbreaking. My favorite quote from the book was "even though i am old and have no antlers, i will never surrender." i liked it because, for a I decided to read Fire Bringer by David Clement-Davies because it was recommended by goodreads many times. A character i found interesting was Eloin (the main characters mother). this is because she gave up her only son so he could be safe from the evil leaders of the herd. i think this showed tremendous courage and love because her decision was utterly heartbreaking. My favorite quote from the book was "even though i am old and have no antlers, i will never surrender." i liked it because, for a deer, antlers are one of the most important things they have, and to stand up and fight without those is extremely courageous. This book made me think deeply about how much your decisions impact what happens in your life. For example if Eloin hadn't given Rannoch to another doe, the story would have been completely different. It also made me wonder what life would be like if some of the important people in history hadn't made the decisions they did.

  27. 5 out of 5

    English315/educ510

    What does the first day of someone's life reveal about their future? Can someone's destiny be determined at the moment of their first breath? One summer in medieval Scotland, a fawn is born to a hind of the Herla red deer. His name is Rannoch, and on the night of his birth his father is killed when the evil herd lord, Drail, murders the guardians of the herd. A birthmark and a prophecy connect Rannoch to a promise that peace will return to the Herla, but because this promise was revealed when he What does the first day of someone's life reveal about their future? Can someone's destiny be determined at the moment of their first breath? One summer in medieval Scotland, a fawn is born to a hind of the Herla red deer. His name is Rannoch, and on the night of his birth his father is killed when the evil herd lord, Drail, murders the guardians of the herd. A birthmark and a prophecy connect Rannoch to a promise that peace will return to the Herla, but because this promise was revealed when he was a new-born fawn and unable to comprehend the events of his birth, he grows up with no certainty of his past or of his future. How much does a person have to sacrafice to embrace their life's true purpose? Read this book to see how Rannoch begins to learn of his life and fate and how he deals with his destiny. Savannah Brasher

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cristina

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Three stars seems to be a rating that I give to a lot of books, but for this book, I think it's a perfect fit. It certainly lives up to its comparisons to the likes of Watership Down—in fact, there's even a scene in the former book that eeriely parallels a certain one featured in the latter (hint: humans + suspicious food = more than what meets the eye). However, this also means that the prose can be a little tedious—perhaps even a struggle—to read at times. Nevertheless, I found Fire Bringer's Three stars seems to be a rating that I give to a lot of books, but for this book, I think it's a perfect fit. It certainly lives up to its comparisons to the likes of Watership Down—in fact, there's even a scene in the former book that eeriely parallels a certain one featured in the latter (hint: humans + suspicious food = more than what meets the eye). However, this also means that the prose can be a little tedious—perhaps even a struggle—to read at times. Nevertheless, I found Fire Bringer's diverse cast of sentient animal species—compared to Watership Down's mainly lapine ensemble, to be rather charming, and I'd certainly recommend everyone to give it a try! (: Overall Rating: ★★★

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I have had this book for a while now and I couldn't remember whether or not I had read it. I found myself without any pressing series to read because I gave up on the Charlaine Harris "Southern Vampire" series and didn't have a pile of (already purchased) books sitting on my end table. I am rather on the fence about this book. It was a pleasurable read but being an enormous fan of Richard Adam's "Watership Down" I couldn't help but be put off by the near parralel plot ... just put deer where rab I have had this book for a while now and I couldn't remember whether or not I had read it. I found myself without any pressing series to read because I gave up on the Charlaine Harris "Southern Vampire" series and didn't have a pile of (already purchased) books sitting on my end table. I am rather on the fence about this book. It was a pleasurable read but being an enormous fan of Richard Adam's "Watership Down" I couldn't help but be put off by the near parralel plot ... just put deer where rabbits used to be. Granted there are some very unique twists and the writing was well done. It wasn't a deep read or something I will pick up to reread a dozen more times but it was a pleasant way to pass the time.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Fire Bringer was a unique read for me, a wonderful fantasy of an animal not usually focused on in terms of heavier stories like this. While the antagonist's goals are a bit out of place, considering what deer are known to be like, it creates a grand climax for the reader. The characters themselves are likable, though not entirely lovable and fall a little flat. Following them as they grow proves to be rather satisfying in the end, though, and their journey flows easily with their growth. The his Fire Bringer was a unique read for me, a wonderful fantasy of an animal not usually focused on in terms of heavier stories like this. While the antagonist's goals are a bit out of place, considering what deer are known to be like, it creates a grand climax for the reader. The characters themselves are likable, though not entirely lovable and fall a little flat. Following them as they grow proves to be rather satisfying in the end, though, and their journey flows easily with their growth. The historical tie-ins also fit fairly seamlessly into the narration, and work well with the situations they are introduced to. Overall, it was a grand novel to read through, not in suspense or thrill, but in nature and tone.

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